sb-eu logo
Story image

It's time to pick up the pace on HTTPS encryption, survey finds

30 May 2017

Less than half of internet sites support HTTPS, despite it being a 'must have' for all businesses, according to a new report from web optimisation provider SEMrush.

The company conducted data on 100,000 anonymous websites and 45% of them supported HTTPS. While the sample was small, many of them supposedly used the secure protocol.

9% of those websites still had insecure pages with password input fields - even though Google requires that any website that collects passwords should be encrypted.

The company says that even minor errors in HTTPS implementation can cost them in user security factors and Google attention.

Last year Google announced that as of January this year, Chrome started marking HTTP pages that collected passwords or credit cards as non-secure, as part of an effort to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure.

That implementation can come down to using mixed content, which means that browsers will warn users about loading insecure content, which can impact the user experience and user confidence. 50% of all analysed websites fell into that trap.

The company also found that 50% of websites that were moving to HTTPS still included errors through internal links to HTTP pages.

8% of analysed websites had an HTTP homepage that didn't match its HTTPS version. While this isn't much of a problem for those websites that support HSTS, those that don't could find that they encounter page competition, traffic loss and poor placement.

At the certificate level, 2% had expired SSL (Secure Socket Layer) certificate, and 6% of websites had a certificate registered to the wrong name. SSL certificates are used to make sure a connection between browser and server is secure, and also stops information from being stolen.

It's out with the old, as 3.6% of websites had an old security protocol, and SNI-related errors accounted for 0.56% of websites.

And it's in with the new: The study found that 86% of analysed websites didn't support HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security), although the technology is relatively new.

Story image
Video: 10 Minute IT Jams - The benefits of converged cloud security
Today, Techday speaks to Forcepoint senior sales engineer and solutions architect Matthew Bant, who discusses the benefits of a converged cloud security model, and the pandemic's role in complicating the security stack in organisations around the world.More
Story image
Ripple20 threat has potential for 'vast exploitation', ExtraHop researchers find
One in three IT environments are vulnerable to a cyber threat known as Ripple20. This is according to a new report from ExtraHop, a cloud-native network detection and response solutions provider. More
Story image
Jamf extends Microsoft collaboration with iOS Device Compliance
Organisations will soon be able to use Jamf for Apple ecosystem management while using Azure Active Directory and Microsoft Endpoint manager to maintain conditional access.More
Story image
Research: 61% of companies have suffered an insider attack in last 12 months
It comes as rapid migration to cloud and remote working and BYOD scenarios leave organisations increasingly vulnerable to insider attacks as a result of the upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.More
Story image
Strong cybersecurity posture crucial for company success - Fortinet
"They should also conduct due diligence to ensure partners aren’t inadvertently creating vulnerabilities with insufficient cybersecurity measures."More
Story image
Radware issues security alert, warning of global rise of DDoS-for-hire
Efforts from corporations, law enforcement and independent researchers around the world have attempted in the last two years to curb this growth – but the industry keeps growing says Radware information security researcher Daniel Smith.More