Story image

Huawei to Poland: 'We'll build a cybersecurity centre if that's what it takes'

08 Feb 2019

Huawei says it will build a cybersecurity centre in Poland if that’s what it takes to convince the world that it’s a trustworthy organisation.

That’s according to Huawei Poland’s head Tonny Bao, who told attendees at a press conference this week that, “We are ready to establish a cybersecurity centre in Poland if authorities accept this as a trusted solution.”

The pleas come after Huawei’s continuing battle with multiple governments, including Poland, Australia, New Zealand, United States and multiple other countries to prove it’s not attempting to infiltrate 5G infrastructure builds to spy on the countries.

Late last year Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was detained in Canada and faces allegations of a cover up against sanctions on Iran.

In January, a Huawei employee based in Poland was arrested and charged for spying. Huawei subsequently sacked the employee.

However, that doesn’t mean Poland should exclude Huawei from 5G network builds.

“If it does happen ... we will try all our means to protect our business and reputation in Poland,” says Huawei regional public affairs director Austin Zhang.

Already Huawei has rolled out cybersecurity bases in the UK and Germany to provide assurances that it takes security issues seriously.

It also operates the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) in the United Kingdom, which has been running since November 2010.

HCSEC provides security solutions for a range of products used throughout the UK’s telecommunications industry. It also works with the UK Government and the National Cyber Security Centre on technical security matters relating to Huawei.

Meanwhile, the Italian Government has denying reports that it will ban Huawei and ZTE from its future 5G infrastructure builds.

“We have no intention of adopting any such initiatives,” a statement from the government says.

Huawei still faces a long battle ahead as regulators, politics and security concerns present roadblocks – at the end of the day, Huawei has to somehow convince governments worldwide that it’s not spying on anyone.

Aerohive launches guide to cloud-managed network access control
NAC for Dummies teaches the key aspects of network access control within enterprise IT networks and how you can secure all devices on the network.
Sungard AS named DRaaS leader by Forrester
It was noted for its disaster-recovery-as-a-service solution’s ability to “serve client needs at all stages of their need for business continuity.”
Gartner: The five priorities of privacy executives
The priorities highlight the need for strategic approaches to engage with shifting regulatory, technology, customer and third-party risk trends.
Thycotic debunks top Privileged Access Management myths
Privileged Access encompasses access to computers, networks and network devices, software applications, digital documents and other digital assets.
Veeam reports double-digit Q1 growth
We are now focussed on an aggressive strategy to help businesses transition to cloud with Backup and Cloud Data Management solutions.
Paving the road to self-sovereign identity using blockchain
Internet users are often required to input personal information and highly-valuable data from contact numbers to email addresses to make use of the various platforms and services available online.
Veeam releases v3 of its MS Office backup solution
One of Veeam’s most popular solutions, Backup for Office 365, has been upgraded again with greater speed, security and analytics.
Too many 'critical' vulnerabilities to patch? Tenable opts for a different approach
Tenable is hedging all of its security bets on the power of predictive, as the company announced general available of its Predictive Prioritisation solution within Tenable.io.