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Huawei founder publically denies spying allegations

According to AP news, the founder of Huawei said that his company would refuse to disclose secrets about its customers and their communication networks.

This is in an attempt to quiet down global security concerns after several high profile arrests and governments refusing to build infrastructure with Huawei tech due to its alleged ties with the Chinese government. 

Ren Zhengfei spoke in about this in a meeting with foreign reporters as Huawei tries to protect its future contracts. 

The USA, Australia, NZ, Japan and some other governments have imposed regulations on the use of Huawei technology over such concerns.

“We would definitely say no to such a request,” Ren said when asked how the company would respond to a government demand for confidential information about a foreign customer.

When he was asked whether Huawei would challenge such an order in court, Ren said it would be up to Chinese authorities to “file litigation.”

Ren said neither he nor the company has ever received a government request for “improper information” about anyone.

Huawei is facing heightened scrutiny as phone carriers prepare to roll out fifth-generation technology in which the company is a leading competitor. 

5G is designed to support a vast expansion of networks to serve medical devices, self-driving cars and other technology. 

That increases the cost of potential security failures and has prompted governments increasingly to treat telecoms communications networks as strategic assets.

The company’s image suffered another blow last week when Polish authorities announced that a Huawei employee was arrested on spying charges. 

Huawei shortly after fired the employee and said the allegations had nothing to do with the company.

As for the case in Canada Ren said he couldn’t discuss Meng’s case while it still was before a court. But he said Huawei obeys the law, including export restrictions, in every country where it operates.

“After all the evidence is made public, we will rely on the justice system,” he said. “We are sure there will be a just conclusion to this matter.”

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