Story image

Hacking of national security projects highlights importance of patching

11 Oct 2017

The recent release of the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) 2017 report revealed a small breach – with massive implications.

In November 2016, the ACSC became privy to a malicious hacking of a small Australian company with contracting links to national security projects where a cybercriminal had successfully compromised the network.

According to ACSC, the adversary had sustained and active access to the network for an extended period of time, stealing a significant amount of data in the process.

This included technical information on jet fighters, transport aircraft, ‘smart bomb kits’ and more. The data was breached on a network with no regular patching regime and a common local admin account password for all servers. 

ACSC asserts the cybercriminal gained access to the company’s network by exploiting an Internet-facing server before using administrative credentials to move laterally through the network where they were able to install multiple webshells throughout the network to gain and maintain further access.

Chief security strategist at Exabeam, Stephen Moore says a large number of cyberattacks today take advantage of well-known vulnerabilities – for which patches do usually exist.

“But while it seems easy to point a finger at those who have unpatched systems, patch management can be a very complex process, not least for a company where just one person manages all IT-related functions,” says Moore.

“That’s why it is important to be able to detect unusual usage of credentials, or in other words, see unusual user behaviour on the network. If an employee begins moving around a network accessing multiple file servers and databases for the first time, and no one else in their department has done so, it can be an indicator of a stolen – but valid – credential.”

Moore says simply ensuring that passwords are complex often doesn’t help in stopping credential-based attacks – something that global security advocate at Digital Guardian, Thomas Fischer agrees with.

Fischer says breaches as this reinforce why all companies regardless of size need to adopt a ‘patch early, patch often’ mantra.

“They also need to regularly review system settings and disable unnecessary services that could leave them open to attack,” Fischer says.

“Unfortunately, businesses continue to underestimate the importance of patching. Keeping IT systems constantly updated and free from known vulnerabilities is truly essential. Most companies, at some point, will have their networks' breached.”

In the aforementioned case, the sensitive defence data was freely accessible due to seemingly no encryption or access control measures in place, which is why Fischer says breaches don’t always have to result in data theft.

“Data-centric security technologies can greatly reduce an attacker's ability to successfully exfiltrate data,” says Fischer.

“This is because, even if attackers gain access to sensitive data, they would be prevented from copying, moving or deleting it without approval.”

The attack surface: 2019's biggest security threat
As businesses expand, so does their attack surface – and that may be the biggest cybersecurity risk of them all, according to Aon’s 2019 Cyber Security Risk Report.
Opinion: Cybersecurity as a service answer to urgent change
Alan Calder believes a CSaaS model can enable a company to build a cyber resilience strategy in a coherent and consistent manner.
New threat rears its head in new malware report
Check Point’s researchers view Speakup as a significant threat, as it can be used to download and spread any malware.
Oracle updates enterprise blockchain platform
Oracle’s enterprise blockchain has been updated to include more capabilities to enhance development, integration, and deployment of customers’ new blockchain applications.
Used device market held back by lack of data security regulations
Mobile device users are sceptical about trading in their old device because they are concerned that data on those devices may be accessed or compromised after they hand it over.
Gartner names ExtraHop leader in network performance monitoring
ExtraHop provides enterprise cyber analytics that deliver security and performance from the inside out.
Symantec acquires zero trust innovator Luminate Security
Luminate’s Secure Access Cloud is supposedly natively constructed for a cloud-oriented, perimeter-less world.
Palo Alto releases new, feature-rich firewall
Palo Alto is calling it the ‘fastest-ever next-generation firewall’ with integrated cloud-based DNS Security service to stop attacks.