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Cylance launches virtual CISO

03 Jan 2019

Cylance has launched a virtual CISO service to give a helping hand to enterprises that need stronger security resources but may lack a real-life CISO.

The program, known as Cylance vCISO, is designed to provide organisations with critical technology and security resources that support next-generation security architectures.

Globally, the cybersecurity skills gap is pronounced – Australia has only 7% of the cybersecurity expertise it needs. Cylance says that the shortage of approximately 2300 cyber professions has cost Australian organisations up to $405 million in revenue.

By 2026, the gap is expected to reach 17,600, as Australia’s share of the cyber security market triples to $6 billion a year, the company claims. The global outlook is in a similar position. Cylance says that the skills gap has increased more than 50% in the last three years and is expected to grow by more than two million this year.

Cylance also claims the cost of cybercrime is projected to reach $6 trillion in 2021. 

Cylance says its security experts provide organisations the expertise to detect and prevent cyber attacks without compromising their ability to deliver on core business objectives.

Cylance Consulting senior vice president Corey White says, “Today’s cybersecurity landscape presents CISOs the challenge of trying to implement digital transformation and other important initiatives across their organisations without the adequate people or systems in place to support the complex environments they manage.”

“To meet those challenges, security leaders require access to expert knowledge on the fly that helps them identify, assess, and communicate security risks to their management teams and boards of directors, which in turn helps them better manage risk and keep the overall costs of security compliance under control.”

Cylance vCISO draws on a broad set of techniques including automation and artifact analysis to collect information and assess data. 

It also defines likely security scenarios to build risk profiles, recommend actions, and highlight internal strengths, allowing organisations to customise their approach to prevention-first security without having to customise all of the technology that supports their security environments.   Cylance says that vCISO helps organisations manage day-to-day security needs and meet common security standards, frameworks, and compliance regulations such as NIST, ISO/IEC, SANS CIS, and more. It does this by assigning experienced security professionals with discrete expertise in the areas customers most want to invest in. Personnel work from remote locations or at a customer’s physical address, depending on the needs and urgency of the project.

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