Story image

70% of security experts say social media should be government regulated

28 Apr 2018

Following on from the Facebook fiasco, the majority of security professionals are of the same mind - there needs to be change with how social media platforms collect data.

Venafi has announced the results of a survey querying 512 security professionals attending the RSA Conference 2018. The study sought to evaluate opinions and beliefs on the intersection of cybersecurity, privacy threats and government regulation.

According to the survey, 70 percent of the respondents say governments should regulate the collection of personal data by social media companies in order to protect user privacy.

Despite this, it appears the majority have little faith in their governments as a whopping 72 percent believe their officials don’t have a good understanding of the threats impacting digital privacy.

“These results are disturbing,” says Venafi vice president of security strategy and threat intelligence Kevin Bocek.

“While security professionals agree that government officials do not understand the nuances of social media and digital privacy, they’re still looking to them to regulate the technology that permeates our daily lives.”

Furthermore, an additional 74 percent of the respondents don’t have have a good understanding of the current cyber threat landscape. However, it would appear their lack of confidence only goes so far as 45 percent believe governments should be able to impose encryption backdoors on private companies.

"It’s disheartening that so many security professionals think encryption backdoors will somehow make us safer. There is no question that they will undermine our global economy and make digital communication much more vulnerable,” says Bocek.

“Any backdoor will be extremely lucrative, so cyber criminals will spend an enormous amount of effort to steal one. And once a backdoor is leaked it’s certain to be available to the highest bidders on the dark web.”

Enterprise cloud deployments being exploited by cybercriminals
A new report has revealed a concerning number of enterprises still believe security is the responsibility of the cloud service provider.
Ping Identity Platform updated with new CX and IT automation
The new versions improve the user and administrative experience, while also aiming to meet enterprise needs to operate quickly and purposefully.
Venafi and nCipher Security partner on machine identity protection
Cryptographic keys serve as machine identities and are the foundation of enterprise information technology systems.
Machine learning is a tool and the bad guys are using it
KPMG NZ’s CIO and ESET’s CTO spoke at a recent cybersecurity conference about how machine learning and data analytics are not to be feared, but used.
Popular Android apps track users and violate Google's policies
Google has reportedly taken action against some of the violators.
How blockchain could help stop video piracy in its tracks
An Australian video tech firm has successfully tested a blockchain trial that could end up being a welcome relief for video creators and the fight against video piracy.
IBM X-Force Red & Qualys introduce automated patching
IBM X-Force Red and Qualys are declaring a war on unpatched systems, and they believe automation is the answer.
Micro Focus acquires Interset to improve predictive analytics
Interset utilises user and entity behavioural analytics (UEBA) and machine learning to give security professionals what they need to execute threat detection analysis.