Story image

The top technologies shaping future ‘proactive’ cybersecurity

12 Feb 2019

There are several emerging technology trends that are set to change the way enterprises protect themselves against cybercrime, moving from passive to proactive.

With cybercrime becoming increasingly sophisticated to the point of becoming a method of warfare, Frost & Sullivan says technologies like machine learning, big data, and blockchain are becoming prominent.

The rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) has opened up numerous points of vulnerabilities, compelling cybersecurity companies, especially startups, to develop innovative solutions to protect enterprises from emerging threats.

"Deploying big data solutions is essential for companies to expand the scope of cybersecurity solutions beyond detection and mitigation of threats," says TechVision from Frost & Sullivan research analyst Hiten Shah.

"This technology can proactively predict breaches before they happen, as well as uncover patterns from past incidents to support policy decisions."

Shah’s analysis comes from Frost & Sullivan’s recent report - Envisioning the Next-Generation Cybersecurity Practices - that looks into enterprise cybersecurity and analyses the drivers and challenges to the adoption of best practices in cybersecurity, in addition to the technologies impacting the future of cybersecurity and the main purchase factors.

"Startups need to make their products integrable with existing products and solutions as well as bundle their solutions with market-leading solutions from well-established companies," says Shah.

"Such collaborations will lead to mergers and acquisitions, ultimately enabling companies to provide more advanced solutions."

Shah has listed the technologies that are likely to find the most application opportunities, which include:

  • Big data: It enables automated risk management and predictive analytics. Its adoption will be mostly driven by the need to identify usage and behavioural patterns to help security operations spot anomalies.
  • Machine learning: It allows security teams to prioritize corrective actions and automate real-time analysis of multiple variables. Using the vast pools of data collected by companies, machine learning algorithms can zero in on the root cause of the attack and fix detected anomalies in the network.
  • Blockchain: The data stored on blockchain cannot be manipulated or erased by design. The tractability of activities performed on blockchain is integral to establishing a trustworthy network between endpoints. Furthermore, the decentralized nature of blockchain greatly increases the cost of breaching blockchain-based networks, which discourages hackers.
Veeam releases v3 of its MS Office backup solution
One of Veeam’s most popular solutions, Backup for Office 365, has been upgraded again with greater speed, security and analytics.
Too many 'critical' vulnerabilities to patch? Tenable opts for a different approach
Tenable is hedging all of its security bets on the power of predictive, as the company announced general available of its Predictive Prioritisation solution within Tenable.io.
Industrial control component vulnerabilities up 30%
Positive Technologies says exploitation of these vulnerabilities could disturb operations by disrupting command transfer between components.
McAfee announces Google Cloud Platform support
McAfee MVISION Cloud now integrates with GCP Cloud SCC to help security professionals gain visibility and control over their cloud resources.
Scammers targeting more countries in sextortion scam - ESET
The attacker in the email claims they have hacked the intended victim's device, and have recorded the person while watching pornographic content.
Cryptojacking and failure to patch still major threats - Ixia
Compromised enterprise networks from unpatched vulnerabilities and bad security hygiene continued to be fertile ground for hackers in 2018.
Princeton study wants to know if you have a smart home - or a spy home
The IoT research team at Princeton University wants to know how your IoT devices send and receive data not only to each other, but also to any other third parties that may be involved.
Organisations not testing incident response plans – IBM Security
Failure to test can leave organisations less prepared to effectively manage the complex processes and coordination that must take place in the wake of an attack.